Top Ten Reasons GPS are Better Than Maps

Posted November 28, 2007 4:00 pm by with 6 comments

There are lots of things that GPS can do that maps simply cannot. I posted this podcast because GPS just happens to be one of the top requested electronics gifts for the holiday season. If you wanted some good reasons to own a GPS, here are ten good ones. :D

6 responses to Top Ten Reasons GPS are Better Than Maps

  1. Justin Hitchborn (hitchface) November 29th, 2007 at 1:16 pm

    Good podcast. However, nothing beats a good map in the bush…if you bring a GPS in the bush, bring a map as a backup. I’ve seen a GPS go blank too many times in an airplane to rely on it fully.

    Granted the features are very nice nice, but if it conks out, then what?

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  2. River Oaks November 29th, 2007 at 1:19 pm

    I enjoyed your podcast. I’m a huge fan of GPS systems and am now on my third version of the system. However, I wish there was an easier way for the GPS systems to be updated. As local venues, restaurants and shops change so frequently – coming to rely on the GPS to find the nearest restaurant doesn’t work very well.

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  3. Rich Menga November 29th, 2007 at 1:33 pm

    If you’re going tromping thru the woods you need a unit that will take a pounding and have built-in two-way radio if the GPS fails for whatever reason. Garmin Rino series does that. Waterproof and supposedly can survive a 7-story drop.

    https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=146

    However it should be noted that you should NOT rely on GPS 100% in the rough. You should know basic terrain knowledge such as “the moss always grows on the North side of a rock” to know where you are and also use common sense.

    If you take a unit primarily meant for terrestrial/trail use on an aircraft you can’t expect it to work like it should. That’s why there are aircraft-specific units.

    http://www.garmin.com/garmin/cms/site/us/intheair/

    Concerning mobile use (what I use most), the only time a GPS with SiRF technology built-in completely fails is if you’re passing thru a mountain (and in that instance you can’t even receive FM radio much less a GPS signal). Previous-gen non-SiRF units did have issues with dense foliage and skyscrapers interrupting signal, but the SiRF completely killed that and keeps the signal super-strong now. You’d be hard pressed to have a SiRF-enabled unit lose a signal.

    Newer Garmins like the c550 and c580 StreetPilot have SiRF built-in.

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  4. Justin Hitchborn (hitchface) November 29th, 2007 at 3:37 pm

    I wasn’t using a ground based GPS in the plane, it was specific for the application. I follow you though ;)

    In general, I like the feel of the whole podcast, just so long as people know that good solid hard skills in the field will get them places in case the GPS conks out.

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  5. David M December 2nd, 2007 at 8:35 pm

    I think it helps to have both. So many times I have heard that an electronic gizmo is going to replace this or that but in reality all the new gizmo does is supplement and not replace something.

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  6. robin December 6th, 2009 at 12:39 am

    I have a GPS and it is good to have, you find places a lot easier then you would using a map.

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